How to make your drink of Kratom

Hello All!

Kratom is a lovely compound. I believe it may provide an individual long-lasting energy with a pinch or punch of relaxation. The herb has the ability to relieve pain, boost metabolism, provide energy, add to immunity and sharpen physical as well as cognitive abilities.  It has been a part of traditional medicine for centuries. It is a unique compound and contains strains with a multitude of personalities for each and every color and variety. Here is the best source of Kratom.

Color of Veins and Strains

White Vein

White vein is the best Kratom that acts as a stimulant to boost energy and concentration. Often used as a substitute for caffeine/coffee to promote wakefulness and mental acuity.  It also offers motivation and fights fatigue.

Good pick for demanding mental tasks. Use white early in the day, preferably in the morning because otherwise, you might get insomnia.

Red Vein

Red is sedative and a relaxed vein that can produce opioid effects. It is a euphoric color, and also famous for pain relief and relaxation of all kinds. They have high levels of 7-hydroxymitragynine than average kratom, an alkaloid associated with analgesia and stress relief. Red Bali and Borneo are great choices.

Green Vein 

Green strains is a balance between white and red. The green vein effects offer long-lasting effects, especially Green Malaysian. People like to use this color for pain relief only because it doesn’t produce drowsiness. It is also picked up to treat social anxiety. Maeng Da or “pimp grade” Kratom is excellent.

Recommended strains

To quickly summarize a few unique Kratom strains:

History

 Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a 4–16-metre high tropical evergreen tree of the coffee family (like Salvia divinorum is of the peppermint family), indigenous to Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and New Guinea. Traditionally, in certain regions of Southeast Asia, the chopped fresh or dried leaves of the tree are chewed or made into tea by local manual labourers to combat fatigue and improve work productivity. In addition, Kratom preparations have also been used for centuries during socioreligious ceremonies and to treat various medical conditions, such as morphine dependence in Thailand, and as opium substitute in Malaya . It has been suggested that the genus was given the “Mitragyna” name by the Dutch botanist Korthals because the leaves and the stigmas of the flowers of the plant resemble the shape of a bishop’s mitre. However, considering its variety of uses, it could be speculated that the term derives from the “Mithraic cults,” seen as a source of spiritual transcendence for thousands of years. It was a part of traditional medicine in the region for centuries for many good reasons.The herb has the ability to relieve pain, boost metabolism, provide energy, add to immunity and sharpen physical as well as cognitive abilities. Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a 4–16-metre high tropical evergreen tree of the coffee family (like Salvia divinorum is of the peppermint family), indigenous to Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and New Guinea. Traditionally, in certain regions of Southeast Asia, the chopped fresh or dried leaves of the tree are chewed or made into tea by local manual labourers to combat fatigue and improve work productivity. In addition, Kratom preparations have also been used for centuries during socioreligious ceremonies and to treat various medical conditions, such as morphine dependence in Thailand, and as opium substitute in Malaya . It has been suggested that the genus was given the “Mitragyna” name by the Dutch botanist Korthals because the leaves and the stigmas of the flowers of the plant resemble the shape of a bishop’s mitre. However, considering its variety of uses, it could be speculated that the term derives from the “Mithraic cults,” seen as a source of spiritual transcendence for thousands of years.

Traditionally, the fresh or dried leaves of Kratom are chewed or brewed into tea or smoked. Ketum is bitter and sugar or sweet beverages are commonly added to mask its taste. To experience vigour and euphoria, traditional “kratom eaters” chew one to three fresh leaves at a time.

Five to ten minutes after Kratom consumption users describe themselves as feeling happy, strong, and active, especially among those working in the agricultural sector. They claim that “their mind is calm” after the consumption of the drug. Overall, there is no real social stigma towards Kratom users and being dependent on Kratom is not seen as a major problem or taboo in Malaysia, at least for men. Apparently, society accepts male addicts who work to support their family but do not accept female addicts. Considering how Kratom use is consistent, figures for treatment admissions for its use appear rather low, accounting for, for example, 2 percent of all drug treatment admissions in Thailand in 2011.

Recent Years

Kratom or Ketum has become popular in the EU, US, and other countries (e.g., Japan) as a recreational novel compound. A variety of Mitragyna speciosa related products are easily accessible from local smart shops and increasingly available for sale on the Internet, in particular on web based “legal highs” pharmacies, but their exact content is not always verified. Many different formulations are available, including raw leaves, capsules, tablets, powder, and concentrated extracts.

Kratom pharmacology itself is complex and requires future research: this compound in fact acts on opioid as well as on dopaminergic, serotonergic, GABAergic, and adrenergic systems. Therefore, subjective effects are very peculiar ranging from psychostimulant to sedative-narcotic. 

Preparing your Kratom

First, there are a variety of ways to consume Kratom. To prepare a drink of Kratom, procure any liquid of your choice. Cold or hot. Kratom is traditionally brewed as a tea. You do not need a teabag, you can just throw the grams in there. Some hot water and a proper dosage (2-6 grams or 1 teaspoon) is all you require. Effects shoukld settle in within 5 minutes to an hour. Do not add Kratom to boiling water; it will destory the alkaloids (no one really knows). Let it simmer at no more than 180 degrees Fahrenheit (just being able to get a good sip out of a hot cup of water for ya mouth) for 21 minutes or so until the kratom sinks to the bottom. Add turmeric, chamomile, lemon juice, OJ, grad juice, cranberyy juice and more to potentiate the effects and sweeten the flavour. Adding honey may be interesting to try.

For beginners, I would honestly try 4-6 grams and sip it over the period of two hours. The effects last anywhere from 3-9 hours. I am honestly unsure if drinking Kratom with hot or cold water increases potency. I know that allowing it to simmer in a heated water suspension is traditional and effective. Thumbs up to any way you consume your kratom. Honestly, eating kratom raw on with food works. Kratom is very versatile, you don’t even have to stir that bit. If you want to get funny, mix your Kratom with orange juice. This may potentiate the effects. Feel free to add whatever you would like to your cooled down kratom! Leave your favorite recipe’s here in the comment section.

The Kratom dissolves well ,if you take the time to stir. Don’t forget to lick the spoon.

Cheers!

Warnings

Physical withdrawal symptoms include anorexia, weight loss, decreased sexual drive, insomnia, muscle spasms and pain, aching in the muscles and bones, jerky movement of the limbs, watery eyes/nose, hot flushes, fever, decreased appetite, and diarrhoea. Psychological withdrawal symptoms commonly reported are nervousness, restlessness, tension, anger, hostility, aggression, and sadness. Long-term addicts are described to become thin and have skin pigmentation on their cheeks, due to the capacity of mitragynine to increase the production of melanocytes-stimulating substance. Regular ketum use is also reported to cause psychotic symptoms such as mental confusion, delusion, and hallucination.

Fun Facts

At present, Kratom constituents are not detected by conventional drug screening tests: advanced tests like liquid chromatography-tandem or ion-mass spectrometry are required.

  • These figures, with the exception of lifetime use, were significantly higher than those for cannabis making kratom the most widely used illicit drug in Thailand.
  • In parallel, kratom-related arrests more than doubled between 2007 and 2011 in both Myanmar and Thailand. 
  • Kratom-related treatment admissions almost tripled between 2007 and 2011. This could be also partially due to a more strict antidrug policy, where individuals caught with kratom are obliged to engage in treatment programs.
  • As kratom is often not monitored in national drug abuse surveys, there is still little information on prevalence of its use. An initial warning about this phenomenon has been launched by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as early as 2005.
  • Kratom can be smoked, but according to users this has no advantage over chewing or making a tea: the amount of leaves that constitutes a typical dose is too much to be smoked easily.
  • A paste-like extract can be prepared by lengthy boiling of fresh or dried leaves and the syrup produced can be mixed with finely chopped leaves of the palm, made into pills and smoked in pipes (“madatin”).

Cheers !

Resources

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Published by fijigod369

I enjoy respecting women and communicating .

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